Entries in perseverance (8)

Wednesday
Oct252017

Level 2 Lesson Plan: Climbing Out of the Dip

Here is a 30- to 40-minute lesson plan that highlights the following lesson objective: “Understand that when one perseveres, great things can be accomplished; if one gives up when things begin to get difficult, nothing great would ever be accomplished.” (Character Building: Social Skills: Perseverance-2a)

Read Follow Your Dreams.

Discuss how following your dreams can seem fun and exciting, and for the most part it will be, but that with almost anything you set your mind to do, you need perseverance and endurance to see it through. No matter how excited you feel at the start of something, often, at some point, you will be challenged and could become tired or discouraged. If you are to see something through to the end, you need to expect it will get difficult, but determine that you’ll persevere? and find a way, or come up with a plan to get out of the dip and push forward.

Watch Katie Discovers the Dip.

Ask your children if they think Katie is in the dip, and how they think she will make it past the dip. Go further and ask your children if they can think of a recent dip they have encountered. It doesn’t have to be a big one. It could be something they feel discouraged about or stuck in. Or if they can’t think of one, you can offer to talk about one from your own life. Recognizing that you are in a dip is the first step, but what are some steps to helping you get out of it?

Read Sticking to the Job = Success!

Discuss how commitment is a huge part of seeing something through to success. Additionally, asking Jesus to help you commit to something—to see it through to the end—will help you to get past the difficulties or obstacles that sometimes make your goals seem way too complicated. But sometimes you can get stuck and not know how to move forward. When that happens, you need to learn how to reflect. Reflection plays a big part in helping you determine what you need in order to get unstuck.

WatchClimbing Out of the Dip.”

Take time to reflect. Now go back to that recent dip your child told you about, or the example you used of a recent dip you went through. Take the time to reflect on it and see what ideas for solutions you come up with on how to climb out of the dip.

Talk about how faith helps you persevere in seeing something to the end. Relying on an extra boost of God’s power can help you climb out of the dips you find yourselves in. You have to believe that you can, and also believe that God can help you see something through to the end. If you find it helpful, tell the child one of your own such experiences.

Read and discuss the verses in “Crazily Cool Card Set: Faith—Stand On It.” Talk about how these verses can instill faith and renew inspiration to continue on no matter how gloomy your child may feel about something. (If you haven’t yet done so, you can print out this page to cut out the cards and color one or all of them.)

Additional material:

If you have other suggestions of supplemental material, or additional activities in teaching this topic, please share your ideas and tips by commenting below. We look forward to hearing from you.

 S&S link: Character Building: Social Skills: Perseverance-2a

Contributed by My Wonder Studio staff.
Copyright © 2017 The Family International

Wednesday
Oct252017

Level 1 Lesson Plan: Bananas and Life Goals

Here is a lesson plan that can be covered in 20 to 30 minutes, relating to the lesson objective: “Learn of the importance of investing into one’s education, and identify with biblical, historical, and present-day characters who were/are successful, due to investing in their education.” (Character Building: Personal Responsibility: Learning and Study Skills-1b)

ReadThat Banana There.”

Listen to the audio, “That Banana There” or view it here.

Watch Dole: Banana Production, Plantation to Port.

Compare some of the points explained about producing bananas to experiences in the child’s life:
1) The banana shoot is well cleaned to make sure it is free from disease. This could be compared to how a parent or teacher explains what is acceptable behavior and what is not. For example, discuss with the child lessons about comportment they may have been learning recently. Talk about how learning takes time.
2) The banana plants are shown growing in clear jars, then planted into pots of ground coconut shell, and finally are planted in the field. This could be compared to how children go to preschool, then primary school, and step by step on to higher education.
3) There are often many steps that need to be taken to reach a goal, just like there are many steps to reach the goal of growing good bananas. Education is one way children prepare for adulthood, through learning important skills such as mathematics, social studies, science, language arts, etc. These steps are important, and it takes time to progress through those steps.
4) Each step is important. Talk about what would happen if one of the steps for producing bananas was not executed properly. For example, faulty drainage could cause young banana plants to drown. Bananas not packed well or kept at an incorrect temperature when shipped to another country will arrive in poor condition or even rotten. 
                In the case of a child’s education, children are trained one step at a time in the variety of subjects that they need training in for their lives. Sometimes it seems tiring or frustrating, as they have to pay close attention to understand the lessons well, but it’s all worthwhile.

ReadYou Can Do It!

ReviewPromises for Schooling.”

Pray one or both prayers in “Pray a Way: School Time.”

Additional material:

S&S link: Character Building: Personal Responsibility: Learning and Study Skills-1b

Compiled by My Wonder Studio staff.
Copyright © 2017 by The Family International

Downloads

DOC: Level 1 Lesson Plan: Bananas and Life Goals (Spanish)
DOC: Level 1 Lesson Plan: Bananas and Life Goals (Portuguese)

Monday
Sep052016

0–5 Lesson Plan: Try, Try Again

Note to parents and teachers: Here is a 20- to 30-minute 0–5 lesson plan on the value of persevering even when it’s difficult.

Watch Try Again.”

Read Keep Trying.”

Talk about things that your children needed to learn, which may have been difficult when they first started to learn, but now are easy to do (walking, talking, riding a bike, playing a game, etc.). Discuss what might’ve happened if your children had tried only once and found the task too difficult, so stopped trying.

ReadBright Pebbles: Run the Race.”

Do the “Action” on page 5 of “Bright Pebbles: Run the Race.”

Read Character ABC: You Can Do It!

Color You Can Do It!

If you have other suggestions of supplemental material, or additional activities in teaching this topic, please share your ideas and tips by commenting below. We look forward to hearing from you.

Compiled by My Wonder Studio staff.
Copyright 2016 by The Family International

Downloads

DOC: 0–5 Lesson Plan: Try, Try Again (Spanish)
DOC: 0–5 Lesson Plan: Try, Try Again (Portuguese)

Monday
Aug312015

0–5 Lesson Plan: Don’t Give Up!

Here is a 15-minute lesson plan on perseverance.

Watch Don’t Give Up.”

ReadBright Pebbles: Run the Race.”

Read The Hare and the Tortoise.”

ColorColoring Page: The Hare and the Tortoise.”

Ask your children if there is something that they find difficult right now, whether in their school or some other aspect of life. Touch on what they might lack in the future if they decided to not persevere in mastering that thing they find difficult. Talk about the benefits of persevering in that thing.

WatchMama, I Remembered.”

If you have other suggestions of supplemental material, or additional activities in teaching this topic, please share your ideas and tips by commenting below. We look forward to hearing from you.  

Compiled by My Wonder Studio staff.
Copyright 2015 by The Family International

Downloads

DOC: 0–5 Lesson Plan: Don’t Give Up! (Portuguese)
DOC: 0–5 Lesson Plan: Don’t Give Up! (Spanish)

Friday
Jan302015

Level 2 Lesson Plan: Making Dreams Come True

Making Dreams Come True” is a 20-minute Level 2 lesson plan on setting goals and making dreams come true. It highlights the following lesson objectives: “Learn to set goals; learn to focus on one task at a time in order to accomplish one’s goals.” (Character Building: Personal Responsibility: Perseverance-2d)

Read Setting Goals.”

Read The Plan: Making Dreams Come True!

Discuss what goals your children would like to achieve this year, or goals you may have as a family for the new year. Next, go through each of the steps outlined in the article listed above.

Read Bite-Size Goals!

Talk about how achievements in sports, architecture, literature, art, and in almost every field were accomplished through small steps that, over time, turned into something great. Ask the children to see if they can think of any examples that illustrate this point.

Read the verses found in “Crazily Cool Card Set: Want Some Power?” Have your children pick out their favorite verse to memorize. Optional: Print out, color, and place somewhere visible.

Additional reading:

If you have other suggestions of supplemental material, or additional activities in teaching this topic, please share your ideas and tips by commenting below. We look forward to hearing from you.

S&S link: Character Building: Personal Responsibility: Perseverance-2d

Contributed by My Wonder Studio staff.
Copyright © 2015 The Family International

Downloads

PDF: Level 2 Lesson Plan: Making Dreams Come True (Portuguese)
PDF: Level 2 Lesson Plan: Making Dreams Come True (Spanish)

Friday
May242013

Level 2 Lesson Plan: Hero of the Month: Nehemiah

Note to parent or teacher: This lesson plan on Nehemiah (this can be broken into shorter parts) highlights the following lesson objectives: “Learn of more of the lives of the great men and women of the Bible. Understand that when one perseveres, great things can be accomplished; if one gives up when things begin to get difficult, nothing great would ever be accomplished. (Christian Life and Faith: Witnessing and Missionary Training: Great Men and Women of God-2a; Character Building: Personal Responsibility: Perseverance-2a)

Have an impromptu discussion on what your children know of Nehemiah’s life.

Watch The Fabulous Bentley Brothers: Nehemiah.”

ReadJuly Hero of the Month: Nehemiah.”

Listen to “Audio Bible Adventure: The Man Who Built a Dream.” (Audio runtime 10:40.)

Highlight how four months elapsed between the time Nehemiah heard of the disrepair of Jerusalem and when the king inquired why Nehemiah looked downcast. These four months were not wasted. Nehemiah fasted and prayed with his friends; he had also prepared a plan for the rebuilding of Jerusalem’s walls that he was able to immediately present to the king when an opening presented itself.

Read Nehemiah 4:7–23. These verses recount how Nehemiah prayed to God for protection and deliverance, but also did his part in arming his men. Ask your children how this concept of prayer plus practical effort is played out in our daily lives. Discuss examples of things we should pray for, where God might also expect us to do our part.

Listen to “Audio Bible Adventure: In Defense of the Poor.” (Audio runtime 9:59.)

Talk about times when we must do what we know to be right, and encourage others to do the same, even if everyone around us is behaving differently. 

Here are some interesting facts to talk about with your children before or after listening to the Audio Bible Adventures on Nehemiah:

ŸThe book of Nehemiah takes place roughly twenty-nine years after the events in the book of Esther, and twelve years after the last account in the book of Ezra.

ŸThe books of Ezra, Esther, and Nehemiah each recount, in their varying ways, the Babylonian captivity of the Jews, and the return of the Jewish people to the land of Judah. Read or paraphrase “Introduction to Nehemiah” found on page 2 of this article, which gives an overview of that time period.

ŸKing Artaxerxes, King Ahasuerus’ son, is the reigning monarch in the book of Nehemiah. (King Ahasuerus, also known as Xerxes I, is the monarch that Esther marries in the book of Esther.)

ColorHero of the Month Coloring Page: Nehemiah.”

Take theHero of the Month Quiz: Nehemiah.”

Additional resources:

If you have other suggestions of supplemental material, or additional activities in teaching this topic, please share your ideas and tips by commenting below. We look forward to hearing from you.

S&S link: Christian Life and Faith: Witnessing and Missionary Training: Great Men and Women of God-2a; Character Building: Personal Responsibility: Perseverance-2a

Contributed by My Wonder Studio staff.
Copyright © 2013 The Family International

Downloads

DOC: Level 2 Lesson Plan: Hero of the Month: Nehemiah (Portuguese)
DOC: Level 2 Lesson Plan: Hero of the Month: Nehemiah (Spanish)

Wednesday
Dec282011

Level 1 Lesson Plan: Reach Your Goals

Note to parent or teacher: Here is a 20- to 30-minute lesson plan that highlights the lesson objective: “Identify ways to practice perseverance: learn to finish what one begins, to ask for help when needed, and to persist despite difficulty.” (Character Building: Personal Responsibility: Perseverance-1c)

*

ReadSetting Goals.”

Discuss how the boy (pages 10, 12) was hesitant to start memorizing his poem for school because he thought it would be too hard, but because his dad encouraged him to do it a little at a time, when the boy did this he was able to reach his goal. Talk about what would have happened if the boy had waited to start memorizing the poem only one or two nights before he was meant to recite it at school.

 Ask your child what he or she thinks would happen if the girl who had to do the book report (pages 10, 12) had waited to read the book just a day or two before the book report was due. What kind of result would she have had then?

 Encourage the children to talk about ways they can relate this lesson to their scholastic studies.

Read and talk about Luke 14:28–30: Explain to the children how Jesus used this anecdote to encourage those who wished to follow Him as His disciples to first stop and make sure they would follow through on serving Him and not quit partway through.

Talk about how it’s the same with any goal in life. When we are setting out to reach a goal, the first step is to decide which goal to reach for, and what steps need to be taken to reach the goal. We then must decide whether or not we are willing to do what it takes to reach that goal.

 For example, if the girl who was saving up for a fish tank and fish thought at the beginning, I want a fish tank with pretty fish in it, and I want to go to the store and buy the fish right away. I don’t want to be bothered with all of the steps of preparing the tank for the fish, then she wouldn’t have been able to reach her goal.

ReadSkills Exhibition.”

Tell the children what skills you have gained in your life, and how this has helped you find fulfillment in this particular area of your life. Talk about any new skills you are working on acquiring as well.

Discuss with the children how each child in the story faced a challenge that they had to overcome, or how they learned other important lessons while acquiring their new skill. For example, Manch had to learn to be diligent in attending his coach driving classes; Nansel wanted to quit after she created her first work of embroidery; Tinshi needed to be attentive with her other studies, and not only concentrate on perfecting her skill of playing scurry ball; and Merchy learned that while he needed to do his best, he didn’t have to do better than others in order to find satisfaction in his work.

Decide on a goal and fill in a printed copy of the chart found at the end of “Setting Goals” (either page 15 or 16, depending on whether you’d like to use the colored version or the black-and-white version for the children to color). If the child is aiming for more than one goal, print out a chart to fill in for each goal.

Celebrate! Plan a way to celebrate reaching the goal. If your child is reaching for a goal, such as setting up a fish tank, then the celebration could probably be directly related to reaching the goal, such as buying the fish to put into the tank. But if the child is reaching for a goal such as learning to not bite his fingernails, then an unrelated celebration might be useful as an encouragement to help him persevere.

You might want to write at the end of the chart a plan for celebrating once the child reaches the goal he or she has decided to aim for.

For some goals, it also might help to celebrate as each step is reached, such as in the example of helping a child to break a habit of biting his fingernails. In that case, the first goal might be going one day without biting his nails, then one week, then one month, then two months, etc. In that case, it might be helpful to have small celebrations for reaching each step, and then a bigger celebration once the full goal is reached.

Memorize Psalm 37:5. Help your children write this memory verse on a card to post next to the “Setting Goals” chart, to encourage them in how God is helping them to reach their goals.

Remember to praise the Lord for His help in reaching the goal. (Read Psalm 150 for ideas on how to praise God for His help.)

Additional material for older children on working toward goals: 

If you have other suggestions of supplemental material, or additional activities in teaching this topic, please share your ideas and tips by commenting below. We look forward to hearing from you.

S&S link: Character Building: Personal Responsibility: Perseverance-1c

Compiled by My Wonder Studio staff.
Copyright © 2011 by The Family International

 

Downloads

DOC: Level 1 Lesson Plan: Reach Your Goals (Spanish)
DOC: Level 1 Lesson Plan: Reach Your Goals (Portuguese)

Wednesday
Sep222010

“Calculating Challenges” Supplement (Learning and Study Skills-1d)

The story “Calculating Challenges” highlights the following learning objective, “Learn to try new things that one doesn’t yet feel capable of doing.” (Learning and Study Skills-1d)

Pick one or two of the following discussion questions or activities to help your child understand the value of this learning objective.

  • Is there a subject or skill you have difficulty learning, or wish you didn't need to study?
  • Can you think of any  historical characters who did great things as a result of learning and mastering challenging subjects, situations, or skills? (Research it if you don’t know of any off hand)

 S&S link: Character Building: Social Skills: Learning and Study Skills-1d

Downloads

DOC: Suplemento de «Desafíos de cálculo» (Aprendizaje y aptitudes para el estudio-1d)
DOC: Suplemento de “Desafios de Cálculo” (Habilidades de Aprendizado e Estudo-1d)
DOC: "Calculating Challenges" Supplement (Japanese)